Kurikulum Nasional Australia: SEJARAH Kelas 7-12

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History: Year 7: Overview of the ancient world

The following content is to be taught as part of an overview for the historical period. It is not intended to be taught in depth. An overview will constitute approximately 10% of the total teaching time for the year. Overview content identifies important features of the period, approximately 60 000 BC (BCE) – c.650 AD (CE), as part of an expansive chronology that helps students understand broad patterns of historical change. As such, the overview provides the broader context for the teaching of depth study content and can be built into various parts of a teaching and learning program. This means that overview content can be used to give students an introduction to the historical period; to make the links to and between the depth studies; and to consolidate understanding through a review of the period.

  • The theory that people moved out of Africa around 60 000 BC (BCE) and migrated to other parts of the world, including Australia.
  • The evidence for the emergence and establishment of ancient societies (including art, iconography, writing tools and pottery)
  • Key features of ancient societies (farming, trade, social classes, religion, rule of law)

Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 7, students suggest reasons for change and continuity over time. They describe the effects of change on societies, individuals and groups. They describe events and developments from the perspective of different people who lived at the time. Students explain the role of groups and the significance of particular individuals in society. They identify past events and developments that have been interpreted in different ways.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, using dating conventions to represent and measure time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They identify and select a range of sources and locate, compare and use information to answer inquiry questions. They examine sources to explain points of view. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, incorporate relevant sources, and acknowledge their sources of information.

 

History: Year 8: Overview of the ancient to modern world

The following content is taught as part of an overview for the historical period. It is not intended to be taught in depth. An overview will constitute approximately 10% of the total teaching time for the year. Overview content identifies important features of the period, c.650 AD (CE) – 1750, as part of an expansive chronology that helps students understand broad patterns of historical change. As such, the overview provides the broader context for the teaching of depth study content and can be built into various parts of a teaching and learning program. This means that overview content can be used to give students an introduction to the historical period; to make the links to and between the depth studies; and to consolidate understanding through a review of the period.

  • the transformation of the Roman world and the spread of Christianity and Islam
  • key features of the medieval world (feudalism, trade routes, voyages of discovery, contact and conflict)
  • the emergence of ideas about the world and the place of people in it by the end of the period (such as the Renaissance, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment).

Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 8, students recognise and explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They explain the causes and effects of events and developments. They identify the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of individuals and groups and how they were influenced by the beliefs and values of their society. They describe different interpretations of the past.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework with reference to periods of time. When researching, students develop questions to frame an historical inquiry. They analyse, select and organise information from primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students identify and explain different points of view in sources. When interpreting sources, they identify their origin and purpose, and distinguish between fact and opinion. Students develop texts, particularly descriptions and explanations, incorporating analysis. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their findings, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and acknowledge their sources of information.

History: Year 9: Overview of the making of the modern world

The following content is taught as part of an overview for the historical period. It is not intended to be taught in depth. An overview will constitute approximately 10% of the total teaching time for the year. Overview content identifies important features of the period (1750 – 1918) as part of an expansive chronology that helps students understand broad patterns of historical change. As such, the overview provides the broader context for the teaching of depth study content and can be built into various parts of a teaching and learning program. This means that overview content can be used to give students an introduction to the historical period; to make the links to and between the depth studies, and to consolidate understanding through a review of the period.

  • the nature and significance of the Industrial Revolution and how it affected living and working conditions, including within Australia
  • the nature and extent of the movement of peoples in the period (slaves, convicts and settlers)
  • the extent of European imperial expansion and different responses, including in the Asian region
  • the emergence and nature of significant economic, social and political ideas in the period, including nationalism

Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 9, students refer to key events and the actions of individuals and groups to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and make judgments about their importance. They explain the motives and actions of people at the time. Students explain the significance of these events and developments over the short and long term. They explain different interpretations of the past.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, with reference to periods of time and their duration. When researching, students develop different kinds of questions to frame an historical inquiry. They interpret, process, analyse and organise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students examine sources to compare different points of view. When evaluating these sources, they analyse origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They develop their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical interpretations. In developing these texts, and organising and presenting their conclusions, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources

History: Year 10: Overview of the modern world and Australia

The following content is taught as part of an overview for the historical period. It is not intended to be taught in depth. An overview will constitute approximately 10% of the total teaching time for the year. Overview content identifies important features of the period (1918 to the present) as part of an expansive chronology that helps students understand broad patterns of historical change. As such, the overview provides the broader context for the teaching of depth study content and can be built into various parts of a teaching and learning program. This means that overview content can be used to give students an introduction to the historical period; to make the links to and between the depth studies, and to consolidate understanding through a review of the period.

  • the inter-war years between World War I and World War II, including the Treaty of Versailles, the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression
  • continuing efforts post-World War II to achieve lasting peace and security in the world, including Australia’s involvement in UN peacekeeping
  • the major movements for rights and freedom in the world and the achievement of independence by former colonies
  • the nature of the Cold War and Australia’s involvement in Cold War and post-Cold War conflicts (Korea, Vietnam, The Gulf Wars, Afghanistan), including the rising influence of Asian nations since the end of the Cold War
  • developments in technology, public health, longevity and standard of living during the twentieth century, and concern for the environment and sustainability

Achievement Standard

By the end of Year 10, students refer to key events, the actions of individuals and groups, and beliefs and values to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and explain their relative importance. They explain the context for people’s actions in the past. Students explain the significance of events and developments from a range of perspectives. They explain different interpretations of the past and recognise the evidence used to support these interpretations.

Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, and identify relationships between events across different places and periods of time. When researching, students develop, evaluate and modify questions to frame an historical inquiry. They process, analyse and synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students analyse sources to identify motivations, values and attitudes. When evaluating these sources, they analyse and draw conclusions about their usefulness, taking into account their origin, purpose, and context. They develop and justify their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical argument. In developing these texts and organising and presenting their arguments, they use historical terms and concepts, evidence identified in sources, and they reference these sources.

Senior Secondary (11?): Periode Kuno
Knowledge and Understanding

Unit 1

Students investigate the significant issues related to at least TWO of the following topics:

  1. Historical authentication and reliability
  2. Preservation, conservation, and/or reconstruction of ancient sites
  3. Cultural heritage, ownership and the role of museums
  4. Treatment and display of human remains

AND

Students study how at least ONE ancient site, event or change, individual or group, chosen from the following topic electives, has been interpreted and represented:

Ancient site

Events and changes

Individual

Group

Ancient Thera (Santorini)

Masada

The Battle of Kadesh

The destruction of Troy

The ‘Fall’ of the Roman Empire in the West

The Roman Games

Alexander the Great

Cleopatra

Cao Cao

The Celts

The Early Christians

There are opportunities to make connections between the significant issues and the ancient site, events and changes, individual or group studied, for example the historical authentication and reliability of Homer’s Iliad as evidence for the destruction of Troy.

An alternative study of an ancient site, event, individual or group may be up to circa AD 650 from any part of the world, for example Lake Mungo; the Classical Maya; the Etruscans; Hannibal; Ashoka the Great; Boudicca, the assassination of Julius Caesar. Any topic other than the suggested topic electives should be chosen on the basis that the ancient site, events and changes, individual or group has been interpreted and represented in different ways, and has been the subject of some controversy.

Unit 2

Students study TWO of the following topic electives, which are to be taught with the requisite historical skills described at the end of this unit.

  1. Old Kingdom Egypt, 3rd to 6th Dynasties
  2. Egypt in the Ramesside Period, 19th and 20th Dynasties
  3. Bronze Age Greece: Minoans or Mycenaeans, 2000 – 1100 BC
  4. Sparta, c. 700 – 371 BC
  5. Persia, 559 – 330 BC
  6. Rome, 753 – 264 BC
  7. Rome, 264 – 133 BC
  8. Ptolemaic Egypt, 331 BC – AD 31
  9. China in the Qin and Han Dynasties, 221 BC – AD 220
  10. Israel and Judah, 961 – 586 BC
  11. Assyria, 721 – 612 BC
  12. India in the Mauryan Dynasty, 321 – 185 BC

For the chosen society, students investigate the chronological and geographical context, social structure, political institutions, economic activities; and ONE of the following features as appropriate for the society selected:

  • Slavery
  • Art and architecture
  • Weapons and warfare
  • Technology and engineering
  • The family
  • Beliefs, rituals and funerary practices

A

  • evaluates the significance of issues associated with the use of sources and evidence for the ancient world
  • evaluates key features and structures of ancient societies and how they shaped people’s lives and actions in the past
  • assesses the significance of individuals, events, features and developments of the ancient world
  • analyses the contestable nature of different interpretations and representations related to a site, event or change, individual or group, and evaluates their usefulness in explaining the past

B

  • assesses the significance of issues associated with the use of sources and evidence for the ancient world
  • explains key features and structures of ancient societies and how they shaped people’s lives and actions in the past
  • explains the significance of individuals, events and developments of the ancient world
  • explains the contestable nature of different interpretations and representations related to a site, event or change, individual or group, and analyses their usefulness in explaining the past

C

  • explains the issues associated with the use of sources and evidence for the ancient world
  • describes key features and structures of ancient societies and how they shaped people’s lives
  • describes the significance of individuals, events and developments of the ancient world
  • describes contested views of a site, event or change, individual or group, and their usefulness in explaining the past

D

  • identifies the issues associated with the use of sources for the ancient world
  • identifies key features of ancient societies
  • identifies individuals and events of the ancient world
  • describes different interpretations and representations of the past

E

  • identifies sources for the ancient world
  • identifies ancient societies
  • identifies some individuals and events of the ancient world
  • identifies interpretations and representations of the past

Skills

A

  • undertakes an historical inquiry selecting and using relevant evidence based on a critical evaluation of reliable and useful sources
  • critically evaluates alternative historical interpretations and representations by selecting and using relevant evidence from a range of sources
  • develops convincing historical arguments with valid and sustained reasoning by synthesising relevant evidence from different sources, and by acknowledging alternative interpretations
  • communicates complex ideas and coherent and sustained arguments using relevant evidence, appropriate language and accurate referencing

B

  • undertakes an historical inquiry selecting and using relevant evidence based on an assessment of reliable and useful sources
  • analyses different historical interpretations and representations selecting and using relevant evidence from a range of sources
  • develops convincing historical arguments with valid reasoning by synthesising relevant evidence from different sources, and by acknowledging different interpretations
  • communicates ideas and coherent arguments using relevant evidence, appropriate language and accurate referencing

C

  • undertakes an historical inquiry selecting and using evidence from a range of appropriate sources
  • explains different historical interpretations and representations using available evidence
  • develops reasoned historical arguments using evidence from different sources, and with reference to some interpretations
  • communicates ideas and arguments using appropriate language and accurate referencing

D

  • researches a historical inquiry and locates answers in sources
  • identifies historical interpretations and representations
  • develops historical accounts using evidence from a limited number of sources
  • communicates a limited argument with referencing

E

  • researches a topic and locates answers
  • identifies different viewpoints about the past
  • recounts historical events
  • communicates information with minimal referencing

Modern History

Achievement Standards

Knowledge and Understanding

Unit 1

Students study TWO topics with at least ONE to be chosen from the topic electives below. An alternative significant development may be chosen as one of the two topics of study in this unit.

The Enlightenment, 1750 – 1789

The American Revolution, 1763 – 1812

The French Revolution, 1774 – 1799

The Industrial Revolutions, 1750 – 1890s

The Age of Imperialism, 1848 – 1914

An alternative significant development or turning point may be chosen as one of the two topics of study in this unit. This could facilitate comparisons in terms of the far-reaching consequences of the developments. Any topic other than the suggested topic electives should be selected on the basis of the following criteria.

Unit 2

Students study TWO of the following 20th century movements:

  • Women’s movements
  • Recognition and rights of Indigenous peoples
  • Decolonisation
  • The Civil rights movement in the USA
  • Workers’ movements

An alternative significant movement for change may be chosen as one of the two topics of study in this unit. This could facilitate comparisons in terms of the far-reaching consequences of the developments. Any topic other than the suggested topic electives should be selected on the basis of the following criteria.

The movement:

  • is within the 20th century period
  • affected large numbers of people
  • led to profound change within society
  • had longer-term consequences
  • has relevance for contemporary concerns, ideas, beliefs, values and motivations.

Relevant examples of significant movements could include: the end of Apartheid in South Africa; the pro-democracy movement in Burma; and movements related to one or more of the following: internationalism, anti-nuclear, environmental sustainability.

A

  • evaluates the extent of change and continuity how it affected the lives of individuals and groups in different times and places
  • evaluates the important causes of change and continuity in particular contexts
  • analyses how different perspectives and responses to ideas, movements and developments shaped people’s lives and actions in the past
  • evaluates the significance of ideas, movements, events and developments at the time and to the contemporary world
  • analyses the contestable nature of different interpretations and representations of events, movements and developments, and evaluates their usefulness in explaining the past

B

  • explains change and continuity and analyses how the lives of individuals and groups were affected in different times and places
  • explains important causes of change and continuity in particular contexts
  • explains the different perspectives and responses to ideas, movements and developments that shaped people’s lives and actions in the past
  • explains ideas, movements, events and developments and their significance at the time and to the contemporary world
  • explains the contestable nature of different interpretations and representations of events, movements and developments and analyses their usefulness in explaining the past

C

  • describes change and continuity and the impact on the lives of individuals and groups
  • describes important causes of change and continuity in particular contexts
  • describes different perspectives and responses to ideas, movements and developments shaping people’s lives
  • describes ideas, movements, events and developments and their significance
  • describes contested views of events, movements, developments and their usefulness in explaining the past

D

  • identifies change and continuity and how individuals and groups were affected
  • identifies some causes of change and continuity in particular contexts
  • identifies different responses to ideas, movements and developments
  • describes ideas, movements, events and developments
  • describes different interpretations and representations of past events

E

  • identifies how some aspects of the past changed and how others remained the same
  • identifies why some aspects of the past changed and why others remained the same
  • identifies responses to ideas, movements and developments
  • identifies ideas, movements, events and developments
  • identifies interpretations and representations of past events

Skills

A

  • undertakes an historical inquiry selecting and using relevant evidence based on a critical evaluation of reliable and useful sources
  • critically evaluates alternative historical interpretations and representations by selecting and using relevant evidence from a range of sources
  • develops convincing historical arguments with valid and sustained reasoning by synthesising relevant evidence from different sources, and by acknowledging alternative interpretations
  • communicates complex ideas and coherent and sustained arguments using relevant evidence, appropriate language and accurate referencing

B

  • undertakes an historical inquiry selecting and using relevant evidence based on an assessment of reliable and useful sources
  • analyses different historical interpretations and representations selecting and using relevant evidence from a range of sources
  • develops convincing historical arguments with valid reasoning by synthesising relevant evidence from different sources, and by acknowledging different interpretations
  • communicates ideas and coherent arguments using relevant evidence, appropriate language and accurate sreferencing ss

C

  • undertakes an historical inquiry selecting and using evidence from a range of appropriate sources
  • explains different historical interpretations and representations using available evidence
  • develops reasoned historical arguments using evidence from different sources, and with reference to some interpretations
  • communicates ideas and arguments using appropriate language and accurate referencing

D

  • researches a historical inquiry and locates answers in sources
  • identifies historical interpretations and representations
  • develops historical accounts using evidence from a limited number of sources
  • communicates a limited argument with referencing

E

  • researches a topic and locates answers
  • identifies different viewpoints about the past
  • recounts historical events
  • communicates information with minimal referencing

Senior Secondary (12?): Periode Kuno

Knowledge and Understanding

Unit 3

Students will study ONE of the following societies:

AND

Students study ONE of the following individuals:

  1. New Kingdom Egypt to the death of Horemheb
  1. Persia, 560 – 330 BC
  1. Archaic Greece, 900 – 600 BC
  1. Athens, 490 – 445 BC
  1. Rome, 133 – 63 BC
  1. Rome, 63 BC – AD 14
  1. Later Han and the Three Kingdoms, AD 180 – 280
 

Akhenaten

Augustus

Caesar

Cicero

Cimon

Darius I

Hatshepsut

Liu Bei

 

Livia

Pericles

Solon

Sulla

Themistocles

Thutmose III

Zhuge Liang

Xerxes

Unit 4

Students will study at least ONE of the following periods:

  1. Thebes – East and West, 18th Dynasty Egypt
  2. New Kingdom imperialism, diplomacy and governance, 18 – 20th Dynasty Egypt
  3. The Athenian Agora and Acropolis, 514 – 399 BC
  4. Athens, Sparta and the Peloponnesian War, 435 – 404 BC
  5. The Julio-Claudians and ‘Imperial’ Rome, AD 14 – 68
  6. Pompeii and Herculaneum, 80 BC – AD 79

A

  • evaluates the extent of change and continuity related to the key institutions, structures and features of ancient societies and the significance of change for society
  • analyses causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts and assesses their relative importance
  • evaluates the possible motivations, and the responses of different people to events and developments, and how they were influenced by the historical context within which they lived
  • assesses the significance of issues associated with the evidence for historical periods
  • evaluates representations and interpretations to explain historical issues and to evaluate contestability, validity and usefulness

B

  • explains the extent of change and continuity related to the key institutions, structures and features of ancient societies and analyses the significance of change for society
  • analyses causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts and their relative importance
  • explains and accounts for the possible motivations, and the responses of different people to events and developments
  • explains the significant issues associated with the evidence for an analysis for historical periods
  • analyses representations and interpretations to explain historical issues and to identify contestability, validity and usefulness

C

  • explains the extent of change and continuity related to the key institutions, structures and features of ancient societies and the impact of change on society
  • describes causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts and their relative importance
  • explains and accounts for the possible motivations, and the responses of different people to events and developments
  • explains the significant issues associated with the evidence for an analysis of historical periods
  • describes representations and interpretations to identify contestability, validity and usefulness

D

  • describes the key institutions, structures and features of ancient societies and how they changed over time
  • describes causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts
  • identifies the responses of people to events and developments
  • identifies some issues associated with the evidence for events and developments
  • describes interpretations and representations

E

  • identifies features of ancient societies
  • identifies examples of change and continuity in particular contexts
  • identifies the individuals and groups involved in events and developments
  • identifies some sources for a historical period
  • identifies interpretations and representations

Skills

A

  • develops focus questions to frame an inquiry and conducts comprehensive research using a wide range of sources and methods
  • selects and applies relevant evidence based on substantiated evaluation of the reliability and usefulness of sources
  • evaluates different historical interpretations and representations with analysis of the strength of the evidence
  • develops convincing historical arguments and synthesises evidence from different sources, to support particular claims with valid and sustained reasoning, and with an assessment of alternative interpretations
  • communicates complex ideas with coherent and sustained arguments with analysis of evidence, using appropriate language and accurate referencing

B

  • develops focus questions to frame an inquiry and conducts research using a range of sources and methods
  • selects and applies relevant evidence based on evaluation of the reliability and usefulness of sources
  • evaluates different historical interpretations and representations by selecting and using relevant evidence from a range of sources
  • develops convincing historical arguments and synthesises evidence from different sources, with valid reasoning, and with an explanation of alternative interpretations
  • communicates complex ideas and coherent arguments using appropriate evidence, language and accurate referencing

C

  • develops focus questions for an inquiry and conducts research using sources and methods
  • selects and applies relevant evidence based on evaluation of sources
  • analyses different historical interpretations and representations by selecting and using relevant evidence
  • develops reasoned historical arguments using and synthesising evidence from different sources, and with reference to some interpretations
  • communicates ideas and arguments using appropriate evidence, language and accurate referencing

D

  • uses inquiry questions to conduct research derived from sources
  • uses evidence derived from sources
  • describes historical interpretations and representations using evidence
  • develops historical accounts using evidence from a limited number of sources
  • communicates ideas and arguments with referencing

E

  • uses inquiry questions to conduct research
  • uses sources to research
  • identifies viewpoints about the past
  • recounts historical events and identifies a limited number of sources
  • communicates ideas and information with minimal referencing

Senior Secondary (12?): Periode Modern

Knowledge and Understanding

Unit 3

Students study TWO of the following topic electives, one from List 1 and one from List 2, which are to be taught with the requisite historical skills described at the start of this unit.

List 1

List 2

United States of America, 1917 – 1945

Australia, 1918 – 1949

Germany, 1918 – 1945

Russia and the Soviet Union, 1917 – 1945

Japan, 1931 – 1967

India, 1947 – 1974

Indonesia, 1942 – 1974

China, 1937 – 1976

Unit 4

Students study ONE of the following topics, with a focus on the period 1945 – 2010:

  • The Changing World Order
  • Engagement with Asia
  • A Globalised World
  • Movements of People
  • The Struggle for Peace in the Middle East
  • The Search for Peace and Security.

A

  • explains change over time in different places, evaluates the significance of change for societies, and for the relationships between different groups
  • analyses causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts and assesses their relative importance
  • analyses how different perspectives and responses of individuals and groups to ideas, movements and developments, and how they were influenced by time and place
  • evaluates the significance of ideas, movements, events and developments over time from the perspective of different groups
  • evaluates representations and interpretations to explain historical issues and to evaluate contestability, validity and usefulness

B

  • explains change over time in different places, analyses the significance of change for societies, and for the relationships between different groups
  • analyses causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts and their relative importance
  • explains the different perspectives and responses of individuals and groups to ideas, movements and developments, and how they were influenced by time and place
  • explains the significance of ideas, movements, events and developments over time from the perspective of different groups
  • analyses representations and interpretations to explain historical issues and to identify contestability, validity and usefulness

C

  • describes change over time in different places, and the impact of change on societies and different groups
  • describes causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts and their relative importance
  • describes different perspectives and responses of individuals and groups to ideas, movements and developments, and how they were influenced by events at the time
  • explains the significance of ideas, movements, events and developments over time
  • describes representations and interpretations to identify contestability, validity and usefulness

D

  • identifies changes over time and how societies were affected
  • describes causes contributing to change and continuity in particular contexts
  • identifies different responses of individuals and groups to ideas, movements and developments
  • describes significant ideas, movements, events and developments in the past
  • describes interpretations and representations

E

  • identifies changes that affected society
  • identifies examples of change and continuity in particular contexts
  • recounts the different responses of individuals and groups to ideas, movements and developments
  • identifies significant ideas, movements, events and developments in the past
  • identifies interpretations and representations

Skills

A

  • develops focus questions to frame an inquiry and conducts comprehensive research using a wide range of sources and methods
  • selects and applies relevant evidence based on substantiated evaluation of the reliability and usefulness of sources
  • evaluates different historical interpretations and representations with analysis of the strength of the evidence
  • develops convincing historical arguments and synthesises evidence from different sources, to support particular claims with valid and sustained reasoning, and with an assessment of alternative interpretations
  • communicates complex ideas with coherent and sustained arguments with analysis of evidence, using appropriate language and accurate referencing

B

  • develops focus questions to frame an inquiry and conducts research using a range of sources and methods
  • selects and applies relevant evidence based on evaluation of the reliability and usefulness of sources
  • evaluates different historical interpretations and representations by selecting and using relevant evidence from a range of sources
  • develops convincing historical arguments and synthesises evidence from different sources, with valid reasoning, and with an explanation of alternative interpretations
  • communicates complex ideas and coherent arguments using appropriate evidence, language and accurate referencing

C

  • develops focus questions for an inquiry and conducts research using sources and methods
  • selects and applies relevant evidence based on evaluation of sources
  • analyses different historical interpretations and representations by selecting and using relevant evidence
  • develops reasoned historical arguments using and synthesising evidence from different sources, and with reference to some interpretations
  • communicates ideas and arguments using appropriate evidence, language and accurate referencing

D

  • uses inquiry questions to conduct research derived from sources
    uses evidence derived from sources
  • describes historical interpretations and representations using evidence
  • develops historical accounts using evidence from a limited number of sources
  • communicates ideas and arguments with referencing

E

  • uses inquiry questions to conduct research
  • uses sources to research
  • identifies viewpoints about the past
  • recounts historical events and identifies a limited number of sources
  • communicates ideas and information with minimal referencing

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